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Gaggia Classic Pro (Specifications And Features)

Gaggia Classic Pro (Specifications And Features)

For years, the Gaggia Classic has been a go-to model for entry-level espresso makers, and Gaggia has recently released an updated version called the Classic Pro.

The Pro model is an evolutionary rather than a revolutionary advancement, building on the features that made the Classic such a popular espresso maker. The Gaggia Classic Pro is an Italian machine, not an appliance.

It’s been around for a long time, but this one has some improvements. The most notable is the commercial steam wand. It has a two-hole steam tip and can produce some nice textured milk for latte art.

This Italian espresso machine is more stylish than the classic model it replaces, but it still has a utilitarian, rather than purely stylish, vibe. The body is stainless steel, which is an unusual feature at this price; typically, a metal face on a plastic body would be expected. The plastic drip tray fits snugly into place and complements the machine’s overall shape and aesthetic.

With manual steaming, you can now pay a lot less for a machine that can compete with Silvia. Continue reading this Gaggia Classic Pro review to find out if it’s a worthy successor!

Specifications Of Gaggia Classic Pro

Taking about perfection, Gaggia Classic Pro has some impeccable specifications that you might want to take a look at:

DimensionsHeight 14.2 in
Width 8 in
Depth 9.5 in
Weight 20 lbs
Boiler Capacity3.5 oz
Boiler Wattage1370
Steam Wand Commercial Style
Steam Wand Usable Length3.75 in
Steam Tip Whole Count2
Water Reservoir72 oz
Drip Tray Capacity16 oz
Pump 15-bar Italian Pump
Filter Basket Capacities7-18 grams
Volts and Watts110V-120V and 1425
AccessoriesPlastic Tamper
Ground Coffee Scoop
Specifications Of Gaggia Classic Pro

What Does Gaggia Classic Pro Come With?

Side view of an Espresso coffee maker with a duo preparation system of filter holders
The Gaggia Classic Pro comes with a lot of features.

It includes a pressurized basket as well as a double shot and single-shot commercial basket. If you don’t have a grinder, you can use the pressurized basket to produce a crema and a decent espresso from any coffee. You’ll get a true commercial espresso if you use the commercial ones.

Another significant difference is the portafilter, which is now 58mm in diameter and made of chrome-plated brass — the same material used on commercial machines. Gaggia has been using the full range of commercial groups with the Gaggia Baby since 1977.

Let’s dig a little deeper into the features, shall we?

Solenoid Valve

The Gaggia features a three-way solenoid valve. After you’ve finished brewing your espresso, a valve directs the pressure and excess water from the group head straight into the drip tray. As a result, instead of a soupy mess, your coffee grounds will be a tidy dry puck when you remove the portafilter.

Cup Warmer

The machine’s top is a passive stainless steel cup warmer. The water reservoir can be filled from above or drawn from below. The Gaggia Classic Pro now has three power, brewing, and steaming rocker switches. Under these switches, there are three ready lights.

Commercial Steam Wand

Barista steaming milk in a steam wand
The machine also comes with a commercial steam wand.

A knob on the machine’s side controls the steam valve, which sends steam or hot water out of the wand. It has a commercial wand with a two-hole steam tip and a rubber grip to keep you from getting burned. The blowout tube now has a rubber grip to make it easier to remove.

PortaFilter

Coffee powder with coffee beans in the background
The Classic Pro also comes with a portafilter.

A 58 mm chrome-plated brass portafilter is included. It weighs 1 pound, has two spouts, and has a nice handle with a new “G” logo on the end. A double-shot pressurized filter basket, a single-shot commercial basket, a double-shot commercial basket, a tamper, and a coffee scoop is included with the Classic Pro. When using the pressurized basket, make sure to insert the two-way pin into the bottom of your portafilter before replacing the basket.

Drip Tray

The drip tray on the Classic Pro has been redesigned. It has a nice curve, is easy to remove, and the drip tray is a good size in general. To access the water reservoir, remove the drip tray and blowout tube before reaching back and sliding the reservoir out. A small crevice on the side of the machine allows you to see the water level in your reservoir and makes it easier to pull it out.

Stainless Steel Housing

The Gaggia Classic Pro has a stainless steel housing that looks good and will not rust like steel housing machines.

How Long Will Gaggia Classic Last?

Well, Gaggia has been in the market for over 30 years. It should last you a decade or two if properly cared for. If you are unable to repair it yourself, one of the local espresso technicians can.

What Is The Shot Quality Of Gaggia Pro?

A shot of espresso is being poured
A shot of espresso is being poured

The Gaggia Classic Pro is capable of producing some truly stunning shots of espresso.
The machine is set to 15 bars out of the box, which is excessive, but I don’t think you’ll notice if you’re pulling more traditional darker roasts for milk drinks.

The main problem with brewing espresso is that the temperature is so volatile. Because the machine overheats and pushes steam out of the brew head, it’s necessary to purge a large amount of water to bring it down to an acceptable temperature.

On the other hand, it heats up quickly, which is great in the morning when you’re rushing around.
The steam power isn’t particularly impressive, but with practice, you should be able to produce some decent microfoam.

What’s The Difference Between Gaggia Classic And Classic Pro?

One of the biggest differences between the Gaggia Classic and Classic Pro is the steam wand.

The Classic uses a Panarello-style steam wand while the Pro uses a commercial steam wand.

Panarello wands are common in less expensive machines and do a good job of maximizing foam production from small boilers, but they produce less satisfying foam and provide far less control. Because of the upgraded steam wand on the Classic Pro, this machine can now froth and steam milk in addition to producing quality espresso.

Moreover, the classic pro is a single boiler design, this means you’ll always be in constant shuffle whether you want to steam your milk first or brew your espresso first.

Here is how you can learn to set up your new Gaggia Classic Pro and use it in style:

Gaggia Classic Pro: Initial Setup and First Use

FAQS

Does The Gaggia Classic Pro Have Aluminium Boiler?

Yes, the Gaggia Classic Pro comes with a single boiler that is made of aluminum, and with daily use, the heating system of the boiler works okay. This is because the machine only has one boiler for heating water for espresso and steaming, so it can be difficult to use. To get the machine down to espresso brewing temperature, you must purge a lot of water.

Is The Gaggia Classic Pro Fully Automatic?

The Classic Pro espresso machine is semi-automatic. This means you’re in charge of grinding, tamping, and timing your shots. If that sounds too complicated, you might want to consider a super-automatic machine like the Gaggia Brera or the Gaggia Anima Prestige.

Does Gaggia Come With Built-in Grinder?

No, it doesn’t. If you don’t own a grinder yourself, the best option is to go for Breville machines, which come with a built-in grinder.

Verdict

  • The Gaggia Classic Pro maintains the excellent brewing quality that we’ve come to expect from the Gaggia Classic while adding a commercial steam wand
  • This machine is ideal for those who are new to semi-automatic espresso machines, but it’s also an excellent value for experienced users
  • Clever design choices, such as the front or top-fill water reservoir and the satisfying tactile switches, show that Gaggia was genuinely interested in creating an espresso maker that’s simple and enjoyable to use daily

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